International Workshop "Advances in Neutron Triple-Axis Spectroscopy"

11.12.2012-12.12.2012, Berlin

Neutron triple-axis spectrometers have widely been recognized as work-horse instruments for single-crystal spectroscopy and have made decisive contributions to our understanding of modern materials. Information about the dynamics is essential to elucidate the underlying microscopic mechanisms governing a variety of macroscopic materials properties and phenomena. Topical scientific subjects include quantum magnetism, high-temperature superconductivity and heavy-fermion systems. All these areas of condensed matter science largely benefit from the availability of specialized sample environment at triple-axis spectrometers including high magnetic fields, low temperatures and high pressure. As neutron technology has made substantial progress over the last 10 years, in particular in neutron optics, many triple-axis spectrometers in Europe witness substantial upgrade efforts and the implementation of advanced neutron technology. Important methodological progress has been made to bring the neutron resonance spin echo technique to a stage now delivering forefront science. Triple-axis spectroscopy is now enriched by multiplexed secondary spectrometers vastly extending simultaneous wave-vector and energy coverage. This adds overview capabilities to triple-axis spectrometers preceding a detailed zoom into a narrow region of interest with tailored resolution properties of the instrument. The present workshop focuses on generating a snapshot of state-of-the-art science performed in neutron spectroscopy. Taking this as the starting point the workshop aims at projecting science topics and matching instrumentation into the future and at identifying trends and perspectives for neutron spectroscopy in general.

The workshop program will cover a broad variety of topics including quantum magnetism, high-temperature superconductivity, and heavy-fermion systems focusing on inelastic scattering using modern triple-axis spectroscopy and its extension, the neutron resonance spin echo technique.