Silicon thin-film solar cells

Silicon Photovoltaics: Solar cells of the next generation

Polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on glass

Polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on glass

Liquid-phase crystallized silicon on glass (LPCSG) prepared by either electron-beam crystallization (EBC) or laser crystallization (LC) resembles wafer-based multicrystalline Si. This material features the potential to combine the advantages of both thin-film technologies (low cost) and wafer-based Si photovoltaics (high efficiencies) and consequently to overcome the limitations of the established Si thin-film technologies.

Hybrid structures from inorganic and organic materials

Hybrid structures from inorganic and organic materials

Combining two materials often creates a multitude of unexpected properties and functionalities. In the framework of hybrid structure research we follow this approach and join organic and inorganic materials (e.g. semiconductors). High cross-sections for light absorption and large electric dipoles are key features of organic molecules which can be varied over a wide range. On the other hand, inorganic semiconductors benefit from a crystalline structure and typically show enhanced charge transport. Combining the advantages of both, inorganic and organic materials, while compensating their drawbacks is the central challenge of hybrid structure research.

Silicon based heterostructures

Silicon based heterostructures

Solar cells based on mono-, poly-, or thin film silicon where the highly doped layers at the front and the back sides are deposited from the gas phase at low temperatures. The hetero contact is formed by the Si-absorber and a material with higher energy band gap (TCO, a-Si:H, SiC). The work aims in particular at the development of an "interface engineered" transition region between the Si-absorber and the heteroemitter.

Light management

Light management

Light management for solar cells deals with the efficient guidance of solar radiation into the cell. The goal is to reach a complete absorption of the light in the active layers of the device. For this purpose optical losses, like reflection or parasitic absorption, have to be prevented. Within this framework the institute works on functional layer with low absorption, for instance TCOs, light-scattering structures and optical simulation of complex device architecture.