HZB researcher Olga Kasian honored as young scientist

Prof. Dr. Olga Kasian received the award from the Chairwoman of the Foundation Council, Prof. Dr. Cornelia Denz, who is also PTB President. 

Prof. Dr. Olga Kasian received the award from the Chairwoman of the Foundation Council, Prof. Dr. Cornelia Denz, who is also PTB President.  © Werner-von-Siemens-Ring-Stiftung

Four young scientists received this award in Göttingen.

Four young scientists received this award in Göttingen. © Werner-von-Siemens-Ring-Stiftung

The Werner-von-Siemens-Ring Foundation has accepted Prof. Dr. Olga Kasian into its network in recognition of her outstanding scientific achievements. Olga Kasian heads a junior research group on electrocatalysis at HZB and is a professor at the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU). The foundation has been honoring young researchers in the technical and natural sciences since 1977 and offers them unique opportunities for interdisciplinary networking.

Electrolysis for hydrogen production from renewable energies

Olga Kasian is being recognized for her research activities on electrolysis for hydrogen production from renewable energies. "Green hydrogen as energy storage has a high potential to become a key technology in a carbon-free global energy sector. Thus, it enables the transformation of our energy system in many sectors," Olga Kasian explains the relevance of her research.

To produce "green" hydrogen, the company relies on the electrocatalytic splitting of water with renewable electricity from wind or sun. However, the catalytically active materials used in this process for electrolysis age over time and their efficiency decreases. Olga Kasian is studying these changes at the atomic level in order to target them and improve the stability of the catalytically active materials.

About Olga Kasian

Olga Kasian has headed the Helmholtz Young Investigator Group at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) since 2019, which focuses on dynamic changes in materials during electrocatalytic reactions. She has been a professor of materials for electrochemical energy conversion at Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) since 2021.

She received her PhD in electrochemistry from the Ukrainian State University of Chemical Technology in 2013. She then worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg. In 2015, she received a fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and moved to the Max Planck Institute for Iron Research in Düsseldorf.

About the award

During a ceremonial award presentation in Göttingen on June 20, 2022, the board of the Werner von Siemens Ring Foundation honored a total of four young scientists. The certificates were presented by Prof. Dr. Cornelia Denz, Chair of the Foundation Council, who is also PTB President. Every two years, the Council of the Foundation honors young scientists who are usually not older than 35 years.

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