Helmholtz Association opens an experimental station at the SESAME X-ray source in Jordan

The HZB colleagues from the Undulators department in front of the freshly spruced-up UE56-SESAME. Since 2019, the team has been working on giving the undulator a second life. Equipped with new magnets and brought up to the state of the art, it has now been installed in the SESAME storage ring in Jordan after 20 years of use at BESSY II.

The HZB colleagues from the Undulators department in front of the freshly spruced-up UE56-SESAME. Since 2019, the team has been working on giving the undulator a second life. Equipped with new magnets and brought up to the state of the art, it has now been installed in the SESAME storage ring in Jordan after 20 years of use at BESSY II. © HZB/Michael Setzpfandt

The undulator was prepared at HZB and stands now at SESAME. It generates the appropriate light spectrum for the HESEB experimental station.

The undulator was prepared at HZB and stands now at SESAME. It generates the appropriate light spectrum for the HESEB experimental station. © DESY

HESEB extends research possibilities to soft X-rays

A new experimental station has been opened at the X-ray source SESAME in Jordan: HESEB, the Helmholtz-SESAME Beamline, has been designed by five research centres of the Helmholtz Association under the leadership of DESY. It considerably expands the experimental possibilities of the facility.

It will make so-called soft X-ray light available for research at SESAME. The radiation is lower in energy than hard X-rays and offers the possibility of investigating a variety of scientific questions in solid-state, interface and surface physics, in physical chemistry, in biological systems and in the earth and environmental sciences.

The Forschungszentrum Jülich, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and DESY are involved in the project.

The experts from HZB's accelerator physics department designed and built the undulator that generates the appropriate light spectrum for the HESEB beamline. Undulators are key components in the operation of electron storage rings. The electrons pass through complex magnetic structures and are forced to follow a wave-shaped trajectory. This produces synchrotron radiation of great brilliance.

The undulator designed at HZB uses refurbished components from the UE56-2 undulator combined with a new magnet array assembled, measured and tuned in Berlin over the last two years. The undulator is now installed and functional at SESAME, undergoing integration into the accelerator systems. It will be able to provide circular and variable linear polarised photons from approximately 150 eV to 90 eV.

Read the full press release on the inauguration of the Helmholtz beamline at the SESAME X-ray source in Jordan here.

ih

You might also be interested in

  • European pilot line for innovative photovoltaic technology based on tandem solar cells
    News
    23.11.2022
    European pilot line for innovative photovoltaic technology based on tandem solar cells
    PEPPERONI, a four-year Research and Innovation project co-funded under Horizon Europe and jointly coordinated by Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and Qcells, will support Europe in reaching its renewable energy target of climate neutrality by 2050. The project will help advance perovskite/silicon tandem photovoltaics (PV) technology’s journey towards market introduction and mass manufacturing.
  • Photocatalysis: Processes in charge separation recorded experimentally
    Science Highlight
    08.11.2022
    Photocatalysis: Processes in charge separation recorded experimentally
    Certain metal oxides are considered good candidates for photocatalysts to produce green hydrogen with sunlight. A Chinese team has now published exciting results on copper(I) oxide particles in Nature, to which a method developed at HZB contributed significantly. Transient surface photovoltage spectroscopy showed that positive charge carriers on surfaces are trapped by defects in the course of microseconds. The results provide clues to increase the efficiency of photocatalysts.

  • A perfect match: perovskite meets perovskite
    Interview
    07.11.2022
    A perfect match: perovskite meets perovskite
    Tandem solar cells, which combine two different perovskite semiconductors, promise high efficiencies and can be produced with very little energy input. Such modules could even be bendable. Together with partners from industry and research, HZB expert Prof. Steve Albrecht is working to realise this vision. His team recently succeeded in producing an all-perovskite tandem solar cell with a certified efficiency of 27.2 %. A conversation about the opportunities and challenges of the perovskite-perovskite technology.