HZB launches Helmholtz International Research School in collaboration with Israel

On 1st February 2018, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has established the Helmholtz International Research School HI-SCORE, which will be oriented towards solar energy research. To accomplish this, HZB is collaborating with the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, the Israeli Institute of Technology (Technion) in Haifa, and three Israeli universities as well as universities in Berlin and Potsdam.

The name “HI-SCORE” stands for “Hybrid Integrated Systems for Conversion of Solar Energy”. The research themes extend from novel solar cells based on metal-organic perovskites, to tandem solar cells, to complex systems of materials for generating solar fuels. These complex materials systems can convert the energy of sunlight to chemical energy so it can be easily stored in the form of fuel.

Renowned research institutes and universities are involved

Besides HZB, the other participants in the new research school include the Freie Universität Berlin, TU Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and the University of Potsdam. Five renowned research institutes and universities in Israel are also participating: the Weizmann Institute, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Israeli Institute of Technology (Technion), Ben-Gurion University, and Bar-Ilan University.

In total, more than 30 doctoral students will be able to carry out their research under HI-SCORE in both Israel and Berlin, and additionally benefit from the comprehensive selection of seminars and advanced training opportunities.

The Helmholtz Association is funding HI-SCORE as the Helmholtz International Research School beginning in 2018. The School will receive a total of 1.8 million Euros from the Initiative and Networking Fund of the President of the Helmholtz Association over a period of six years. In addition, the collaborating partners and HZB are making their own contributions, so that the total budget will be approximately 7 million Euros.

Great opportunity for PhD Students

“HZB is taking on even greater responsibility for the education of the next generation of scientists in the field of solar energy through the HI-SCORE International Research School", says Prof. Roel van de Krol, spokesperson of HI-SCORE. Four students are already working at HZB under a pilot project. Now about additional 30 places can be filled in Israel and Germany. “All of the HI-SCORE doctoral students will conduct research in both countries and be advised by staff at HZB as well as by the Israeli partners. This will enable them to acquire foreign experience and prepare themselves for an international career. HI-SCORE will also be working closely with the graduate schools at HZB and will thereby broaden what HZB can offer to students", according to van de Krol.

arö/sz


You might also be interested in

  • Unconventional piezoelectricity in ferroelectric hafnia
    Science Highlight
    26.02.2024
    Unconventional piezoelectricity in ferroelectric hafnia
    Hafnium oxide thin films are a fascinating class of materials with robust ferroelectric properties in the nanometre range. While their ferroelectric behaviour is extensively studied, results on piezoelectric effects have so far remained mysterious. A new study now shows that the piezoelectricity in ferroelectric Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 thin films can be dynamically changed by electric field cycling. Another ground-breaking result is a possible occurrence of an intrinsic non-piezoelectric ferroelectric compound. These unconventional features in hafnia offer new options for use in microelectronics and information technology.
  • 14 parameters in one go: New instrument for optoelectronics
    Science Highlight
    21.02.2024
    14 parameters in one go: New instrument for optoelectronics
    An HZB physicist has developed a new method for the comprehensive characterisation of semiconductors in a single measurement. The "Constant Light-Induced Magneto-Transport (CLIMAT)" is based on the Hall effect and allows to record 14 different parameters of transport properties of negative and positive charge carriers. The method was tested now on twelve different semiconductor materials and will save valuable time in assessing new materials for optoelectronic applications such as solar cells.
  • Sodium-ion batteries: How doping works
    Science Highlight
    20.02.2024
    Sodium-ion batteries: How doping works
    Sodium-ion batteries still have a number of weaknesses that could be remedied by optimising the battery materials. One possibility is to dope the cathode material with foreign elements. A team from HZB and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin has now investigated the effects of doping with Scandium and Magnesium. The scientists collected data at the X-ray sources BESSY II, PETRA III, and SOLARIS to get a complete picture and uncovered two competing mechanisms that determine the stability of the cathodes.