HZB and TU Berlin: New joint research group at BESSY II

Prof. Birgit Kanngießer heads a joint research group on X-ray methods, which is funded by TU Berlin and HZB.

Prof. Birgit Kanngießer heads a joint research group on X-ray methods, which is funded by TU Berlin and HZB. © Martin Weinhold

Birgit Kanngießer is setting up a joint research group to combine X-ray methods in laboratories and at large-scale facilities. In particular, the physicist wants to investigate how X-ray experiments on smaller laboratory instruments can be optimally complemented with more complex experiments that are only possible at synchrotron sources such as BESSY II. 

Prof. Dr. Birgit Kanngießer is professor of analytical X-ray Physics at the Technische Universität Berlin, where she also heads a large research group. Together with the Max Born Institute she has build up BLiX (Berlin laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies), which brings established X-ray methods from the synchrotron into the laboratory. At BESSY II she was involved as one of the first users from the early on.

Now HZB and TU Berlin are funding a joint research group headed by Birgit Kanngießer to strengthen this cooperation. This should also accelerate the exchange of knowledge and technology between BESSY II and university laboratories.

The joint research group is called 'Combined X-ray methods at BLiX and BESSY II - SyncLab'. On the TU Berlin side, the Berlin laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) is integrated. Kanngießer will initially focus on evaluating how time-resolved measurements using near-edge X-ray spectroscopy in the soft X-ray range on smaller instruments and at BESSY II could complement each other. Further analytical and imaging X-ray methods are to follow in the future.

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