New 12 T magnet on BESSY II’s experimental floor strengthens energy and magnetism research

</p> <p>Exhausted but happy: f.l.t.r. - K. Holldack (HZB), A. Schnegg (MPI CEC M&uuml;lheim, HZB), T. Lohmiller (HZB, HUB), D. Ponwitz (HZB) after the successful commissioning of the new 12T magnet (green).</p> <p>

Exhausted but happy: f.l.t.r. - K. Holldack (HZB), A. Schnegg (MPI CEC Mülheim, HZB), T. Lohmiller (HZB, HUB), D. Ponwitz (HZB) after the successful commissioning of the new 12T magnet (green).

Electron paramagnetic resonance (THz-EPR) at BESSY II provides important information on the electronic structure of novel magnetic materials and catalysts. In mid-January 2022, the researchers brought a new, superconducting 12-T magnet into operation at this end station, which promises new scientific insights.

At the THz-EPR end station, unique experimental conditions are provided through a combination of coherent THz-light from BESSY II and high magnetic fields. These capabilities have now been extended by a new superconducting 12 T magnet, acquired through funding from the BMBF network project “ERP-on-a-Chip” and HZB.

“The extended capabilities of the new setup will allow exciting new science with user groups and within our joint lab EPR4Energy operated together with Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Mühlheim. We are very pleased about the successful commissioning of the superconducting magnet, which currently delivers the highest magnetic field at BESSY II”, says Karsten Holldack, the responsible beamline scientist.

(red)


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