New Chapter in the Research with Synchrotron Radiation

Junior scientist from Berlin extents the range of application of X-ray methods and receives prestigious award.

Dr. Emad Aziz Bekhit from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB) is this year's recipient of the renowned Dale Sayers Award–an award presented every three years by the International X-ray Absorption Society (IXAS), hon-ouring successful junior scientists.
The award will be presented in Camerino (Italy) on July 31, 2009 during the largest conference on research with X-rays worldwide. The award is

IH


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