Young Investigators Workshop of the Helmholtz Virtual Institute "Dynamic Pathways in Multidimensional Landscapes"

The Virtual Institute explores the governing principles of material’s function in an internationally highly visible centre of excellence. From now on, young scientists (PhD students, master students, and young postdocs) are invited to participate in the Young Investigators Workshop that will take place from 23rd to 28th April 2017 at the Eibsee-Hotel in the Bavarian Alps. It focuses on the research topics of the Helmholtz Virtual Institute 419 and includes both experimental and theoretical projects on molecular and chemical dynamics, phase transitions and switching as well as fundamental light-matter interaction.

We strongly encourage young scientists (PhD students, master students, and young postdocs) who work in this field to participate in this workshop, and to present and discuss their results in an informal atmosphere.

For eligible young researchers this Virtual Institute covers costs for accommodation, board, and travel costs according to VI regulations.

Workshop programme

Sunday 23rd April: arrival, dinner/get together, evening talk.

Monday – Thursday: morning session talks - outdoor workshop – afternoon session talks.

Friday 28th April: departure.

Each participant is asked to give a talk (duration 15 + 5 minutes discussion).

Date and Location

The Young Investigators Workshop takes place from 23rd to 28th April 2017 at the Eibsee-Hotel in the Bavarian Alps near Grainau. The Eibsee-Hotel has direct access to ski and hiking areas.

Application deadline is on Febuary 10th. Please apply via email by sending a short CV and an abstract (about 250 words) to grunewald@helmholtz-berlin.de. The number of available places is limited.

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