X-Ray microscopy: HZB-TXM is back in operation

Comparison of the same specimen at the old Beamline (left) and the new HZB-XM-Beamline (right).

Comparison of the same specimen at the old Beamline (left) and the new HZB-XM-Beamline (right). © HZB

The X-ray microscope (HZB-TXM) is back in operation. The TXM offers significantly  better quality images compared to the former X-ray microscopy station.

It is located at the brand-new U41-L06-PGM1-XM Beamline, which was designed to extend the available photon energy range to the tender X-ray regime (2 keV -2,5 keV). This will allow accessing the silicon, phosphor and sulphur K-edges to study crucial processes in cell membranes and catalysts.

Pictures of identical test objects demonstrate the improved performance of the new TXM. The X-ray microscopy is much in demand by users worldwide and the new TXM is already overbooked for the beamtime allocation period 2017-II. First user experiments have been already conducted.

More information

Peter Guttmann


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