Kickoff for Joint Lab with IFW Dresden

Kickoff with a meeting on 19 June 2017:  Prof. Borisenko, Dr. Rienks, Prof. Büchner (all IFW), the leader of the Young Investigator Group Dr. Fedorov; Dr. Varykhalov and apl. Prof. Rader (both HZB) (from left to right).

Kickoff with a meeting on 19 June 2017: Prof. Borisenko, Dr. Rienks, Prof. Büchner (all IFW), the leader of the Young Investigator Group Dr. Fedorov; Dr. Varykhalov and apl. Prof. Rader (both HZB) (from left to right). © HZB

The Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden (IFW) and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) have created a Joint Lab for “functional quantum materials” and under its umbrella a Young Investigator Group.

The Joint Lab "Functional Quantum Materials" will take advantage of the long-standing expertise of both institutes in energy and materials research and the growth of epitaxial films.  

The new lab is dedicated to explore new materials with promising quantum properties for future applications, for instance in information technologies. The scientists will further develop the common instrumentation at BESSY II with its unique properties - part of them without rival in the world.

With the joint lab, IFW Dresden and HZB intensify their collaboration in research and the promotion of young scientists. Dr. Alexander Fedorov, aged 29, is an internationally renowned young scientist who will move from Cologne to Berlin to head the Young Investigator Group.

O. Rader

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