Renske van der Veen heads new department "Atomic Dynamics in Light-Energy Conversion"

Renske van der Veen has a lot of experience with ultrafast x-ray measurements.

Renske van der Veen has a lot of experience with ultrafast x-ray measurements. © Irene Böttcher-Gajweski/MPIBC

From June 2021, Dr. Renske van der Veen is setting up a new research group at HZB. The chemist is an expert in time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and electron microscopy and studies catalytic processes that enable the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy.

Dr. Renske van der Veen successfully obtained a Helmholtz Funding of first-time professorial appointments of excellent women scientists (W2/W3), whereupon the HZB has already initiated an S-W2 appointment procedure at TU Berlin. She has 14 years of experience in the field of ultrafast X-ray methods. "At BESSY II, I can apply and expand this experience in my research project," says van der Veen, emphasising, "The results could also contribute to the scientific case for BESSY III."

Renske van der Veen studied at ETH Zurich, received her PhD from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and conducted research at the California Institute of Technology, the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, and the University of Illinois, where she held an assistant professorship. Her research was honoured with the Sofja Kovalevskaja Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering.

At HZB, Renske van der Veen is now looking forward to exchange with research groups working on related topics, from modelling ultrafast energy transfer, developing ultrafast techniques at BESSY II, to developing photoelectrodes and heterogeneous photocatalysts at the Institute for Solar Fuels.

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