Neutron data help to reveal “spooky” entanglement in quantum magnets

Illustration of the QFI calculation ​

Illustration of the QFI calculation ​ © Nathan Armistead/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Using data from the British neutron source ISIS from the year 2000, research teams have now demonstrated the viability of a “quantum entanglement witness” capable of proving the presence of entanglement between magnetic particles, or spins, in a quantum material. A team from HZB led by Prof. Bella Lake was also involved in the analysis.

Rosie de Laune, ISIS,

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