Collaboration between HZB and the University of Freiburg

The theory group with Joe Dzubiella.

The theory group with Joe Dzubiella. © HZB

Through a Joint Research Group entitled “Simulation of Energy Materials“ Prof. Joachim Dzubiella of the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg will be able to continue his collaboration with the HZB. The theoretical physicist headed the “Theory and Simulation“ group at the HZB until recently and worked closely together with colleagues conducting experimental research. The new research group will concentrate on electrochemical energy storage and solar fuels.

From 2010 until spring 2018, Joachim Dzubiella was a scientist at HZB carrying on research and building up his theory group. He appreciated the short paths to experimentalists and worked closely with them. In 2015 he received a Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council that enabled him to further expand his group.

The physicist accepted a W3 professorship in Applied Theoretical Physics at the University of Freiburg In April 2018. But the collaboration with the HZB will continue. This has been made possible now through a Joint Research Group entitled "Simulation of Energy Materials" funded by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and the University of Freiburg.

“In the field of solar fuels, there is great interest in more clearly understanding the processes taking place at the catalyst layers that facilitate the splitting of water“, explains Dzubiella. There are also numerous aspects of electrochemical energy storage that can be analysed significantly better through modelling. The Joint Research Group currently consists of seven researchers. The focus is on what happens at the interfaces between liquid and solid phases, which are simulated by theorists with computer models in order to track down the driving forces.

The group members from Freiburg and Berlin will exchange ideas with Skype meetings, visits, and retreats in the countryside. Initial funding has been secured for five years.

More Information: http://helmholtz-berlin.de/forschung/oe/ee/simulation/

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