Prof. Rutger Schlatmann is Chair of the European Platform for Photovoltaics

Rutger Schlatmann become the newly elected Chair of the European Technology & Innovation Platform for Photovoltaics (ETIP PV).

Rutger Schlatmann become the newly elected Chair of the European Technology & Innovation Platform for Photovoltaics (ETIP PV). © HZB/M. Setzpfandt

Rutger Schlatmann is a solar expert from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and professor at the Berlin University of Applied Sciences. At the HZB he heads the Competence Centre for Photovoltaics, which successfully brings together solar research and industry. Now the expert has been elected as chairman of the European Technology and Innovation Platform for Photovoltaics (ETIP PV). It provides independent advice on energy policy issues and the expansion of photovoltaics in Europe.

Schlatmann is supported by David Moser, who is a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of European Renewable Energy Research Centers (EUREC) as well as Jutta Trube, Division Manager of VDMA Sector Group Photovoltaic Equipment, who was elected as the new Vice-Chairperson of the ETIP PV Steering Committee.

For a healthy photovoltaic ecosystem in Europe

Following his election, newly elected ETIP PV Chair, Rutger Schlatmann, expressed his optimism:

“Photovoltaic solar energy in Europe and globally has entered a new and decisive phase. The technology is ready to take a major role in the transition towards a fully renewable energy system. Still, there is ample room for further innovations and continued efforts are necessary to maintain Europe’s position at the technological forefront. ETIP PV has outlined this innovation potential in the recent Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda for Photovoltaics (SRIA).”

Schlatman emphasises that technological leadership and security of energy supply can only be upheld with a thriving and complete supply chain for solar module production on the continent. “Therefore, ETIP PV and its partners will continue to strive for a healthy photovoltaic ecosystem in Europe” he adds.

About European Technology and Innovation Platform for Photovoltaics (ETIP PV)

The European Technology and Innovation Platform for Photovoltaics provides advice on solar photovoltaic energy policy. It is an independent body recognised by the European Commission as a representative of the photovoltaic sector. Its recommendations may cover the areas of research and innovation, market development including competitiveness, education and industrial policy.

Here you find the long version of the press release.

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